Increase font size for Post - A Few Thoughts on the “Occupation” of D.C.Reset to normal font size for Post - Blog - D.C. Police Union - A Few Thoughts on the “Occupation” of D.C.Decrease font size for Post - A Few Thoughts on the “Occupation” of D.C. - Blog - D.C. Police Union

A Few Thoughts on the “Occupation” of D.C.

A Few Thoughts on the "Occupation" of D.C.stdClass Object ( [ID] => 3250 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2011-11-17 11:58:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-11-17 16:58:20 [post_content] =>   by, Timothy Finnegan Publications Committee After spending an eight 8 hour shift monitoring the Occupy Wall Street campground set up in McPherson Square (instead of going out on patrol and, you know, actually patrolling and protecting residents in one of the District's busiest police districts), I had a few observations:  With the smell of marijuana wafting through the air, it seems that a listless, confused, and sometimes angry few are steering the Nation's capital to an unpleasant stalemate at McPherson Square.  They are not unaided, when you have District politicians like Councilmember Mary Cheh making soft comments such as; “"I think we should continue to monitor the situation, and once circumstances become such that health, sanitation or safety become an issue, we are going to have to ask them to leave as overnight guests."” (Easy to say when the encampment is not in her Ward (Ward 3) and police resources are not stretched as thin in Ward 3 as they are elsewhere.) Well, Ms. Cheh, with nothing else to do except smoke marijuana, eat donated food, and having what appears to be fun inside the encampment - with complete impunity to ignore D.C. laws (impunity, that we do not grant to our tax-paying residents), the occupiers might not want to leave.  After coddling and bending over-backwards for the occupiers, what is the city going to do when the occupiers refuse Ms. Cheh's request? It did not have to be this way. It was refreshing to read a different perspective on how protests used to be handled in the District. According to former head of the MPD Special Operations Division Robert W. Klotz, in 1979 farmers came to D.C. to protest farm policy (see the Washington Post article linked below). The farmers showed up with their tractors and “disregarded” an agreement that had been made between MPD and the farmers. As a result, according to Klotz, MPD responded with some tear gas and made a few arrests, and it was done. A pretty simple idea; draw bright lines that protect residents, protestors, and property, and, if those lines are crossed, the event is over and the city returns to the residents and visitors that respect the rights of others and the rule of law (and officers can get back to protecting the residents in their patrol areas). With the specter of the catastrophic management failure and cover-up over Pershing Park hanging over MPD's head, we don't draw bright lines, let alone use tear gas, in today's MPD (just ask anyone who was at the Convention Center). So, as usual, when the politicians and management are finally forced to take action, we, the members of the D.C. Police Union will be left to clean up the mess, and take the blame. The frustration will be knowing that it did not have to be this way, and that there will be zero accountability for management and politicians. Occupy Q&A: Robert Klotz, former D.C. police official, talks protests, then and now Read the Washington Post article here Officials should prepare for closing Occupy D.C. encampments Read the Washington Post article here [post_title] => A Few Thoughts on the "Occupation" of D.C. [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => a-few-thoughts-on-the-occupation-of-d-c [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-11-23 23:30:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-11-24 04:30:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.fop-mpd.com/?p=3250 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [ancestors] => Array ( ) [filter] => raw ) adminadmin

 
by,
Timothy Finnegan
Publications Committee

After spending an eight 8 hour shift monitoring the Occupy Wall Street campground set up in McPherson Square (instead of going out on patrol and, you know, actually patrolling and protecting residents in one of the District’s busiest police districts), I had a few observations:  With the smell of marijuana wafting through the air, it seems that a listless, confused, and sometimes angry few are steering the Nation’s capital to an unpleasant stalemate at McPherson Square.  They are not unaided, when you have District politicians like Councilmember Mary Cheh making soft comments such as; “”I think we should continue to monitor the situation, and once circumstances become such that health, sanitation or safety become an issue, we are going to have to ask them to leave as overnight guests.”” (Easy to say when the encampment is not in her Ward (Ward 3) and police resources are not stretched as thin in Ward 3 as they are elsewhere.)

Well, Ms. Cheh, with nothing else to do except smoke marijuana, eat donated food, and having what appears to be fun inside the encampment – with complete impunity to ignore D.C. laws (impunity, that we do not grant to our tax-paying residents), the occupiers might not want to leave.  After coddling and bending over-backwards for the occupiers, what is the city going to do when the occupiers refuse Ms. Cheh’s request?

It did not have to be this way. It was refreshing to read a different perspective on how protests used to be handled in the District. According to former head of the MPD Special Operations Division Robert W. Klotz, in 1979 farmers came to D.C. to protest farm policy (see the Washington Post article linked below). The farmers showed up with their tractors and “disregarded” an agreement that had been made between MPD and the farmers. As a result, according to Klotz, MPD responded with some tear gas and made a few arrests, and it was done. A pretty simple idea; draw bright lines that protect residents, protestors, and property, and, if those lines are crossed, the event is over and the city returns to the residents and visitors that respect the rights of others and the rule of law (and officers can get back to protecting the residents in their patrol areas).

With the specter of the catastrophic management failure and cover-up over Pershing Park hanging over MPD’s head, we don’t draw bright lines, let alone use tear gas, in today’s MPD (just ask anyone who was at the Convention Center). So, as usual, when the politicians and management are finally forced to take action, we, the members of the D.C. Police Union will be left to clean up the mess, and take the blame. The frustration will be knowing that it did not have to be this way, and that there will be zero accountability for management and politicians.

Occupy Q&A: Robert Klotz, former D.C. police official, talks protests, then and now
Read the Washington Post article here

Officials should prepare for closing Occupy D.C. encampments
Read the Washington Post article here

Comments are closed.

Recent Activities

Blog

News Articles

Follow us on Twitter

  • Currently there are no tweets to display.